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Connect2Classes Visits The School For Visual Concepts (SVC)

How to Write a Brilliant Creative Brief workshop lives up to its name

Learning new skills is a great investment, but how do you know which classes are worth your time? The Connect2Classes team are helping you figure it out by trying out workshops from their top course providers themselves and seeing who earns their stamp of approval.

First up was Seattle’s School of Visual Concepts (SVC), an industry-leader in delivering classes taught by working professionals in marketing, branding, design and content creation.

Michael Duarte-Pedrosa, VP of Sales at Connect2Classes, recently participated in the How to Write a Brilliant Creative Brief workshop at SVC. If you work with any creative team, learning how to develop a quality creative brief is an indispensable skill. It helps define the problem and create the framework to solve it.

“SVC provided an intimate class of nine students made up of designers and marketers from the Seattle area. The experience was as brilliant as the course title would suggest,” said Michael.

“This particular course was led by Hillary Miller, a VP from a Seattle-based advertising firm. Her delivery was playful and the course content was practical,” Michael shared. “We all left with real world examples, along with simple tips and tricks to developing a great creative brief.”

“Hillary made her lessons relatable. She suggested that we approach each brief from the ‘right altitude’. It’s like reading with aging eyes — one needs to hold the passage at the correct distance allowing your eyes to focus on the letters and words,” Michael learned.

“If you or your organization have not used creative briefs previously or have lost sight of why you should, this workshop will equip you with the tools and motivation to do so.”

SVC has created an exceptional learning environment with a beautiful facility, a responsive administrative team, and professional guest instructors — all evidenced by the exceptional student reviews and enrollment in multiple courses.

Now is the time to springboard your brand or marketing initiatives to the next level by checking out current and future SVC course offerings on Connect2Classes.com.

Watch for our full series of Connect2Classes tested courses in the coming months.

About Connect2Classes — We are a marketplace for professional and life enriching classes, workshops, and learning immersives — connecting voracious learners with the best local expertise. In Seattle, Online, and San Francisco!

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The Best Way to Predict the Future is To Invent It!

Master Classes in Leadership and Management, Process Improvement, Design and Creative, Strategic and Online Marketing, and Technology — Team Building Events From Local Master Talent, Too!

Connect2Classes is a local learning marketplace with master classes from our world-class providers, including The American Management Association, The Effectiveness Institute, The School of Visual Concepts, General Assembly, The UW Foster School of Business, The Sundust Oracle Institute, and The Project Management Academy.

We also offer custom, onsite training and learning events for groups, as well as team building activities from local master talent. We can organize all of the details, including venue and catering, or we can bring it all to you onsite. Our learning consultants can discuss your business objectives with you and offer the perfect mix of learning and motivation to prepare you for the future by transforming your organization’s knowledge, cohesion, and practices.

Learn More About Private Classes

Upcoming Master Classes, Workshops, and Bootcamps:

Leadership and Management

Process Improvement

Creative and Design

Strategic and Online Marketing

Technology

Team-Building Activities

Team building and corporate events don’t have to be awkward and uncomfortable. If you want to be happy, learn something new; if you want your work team to gel, learn something new together. We guarantee it won’t feel like a day in the office!

Here are some ideas: Sushi, French cuisine, chocolate everything, paddleboarding, perfecting your batting average, over 21 activities like wine tasting, mixing cocktails, and brewing.

Contact us for more information or to brainstorm your learning and team-building needs!

206.397.0011 or 855.527.3222

Connect@Connect2Classes.com

http://www.connect2classes.com

About Connect2Classes — We are a marketplace for professional and life enriching classes, workshops, and learning immersives — connecting voracious learners with the best local expertise. In Seattle, Online, and San Francisco!

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Go Back to School and Build Your Career

Everyone Can Benefit From Being Current and Savvy About New Technologies, Business Practices, and Other Learning Trends

Technological change demands stronger and more continuous connections between education and employment. –Andrew Palmer, The Economist

As technology advances, it’s no longer enough to rely solely on formal education and college degrees when seeking employment. We need to be learning all the time as we adapt to changing conditions in our jobs, careers, and business markets.

The Economist recently published an article on the importance of lifelong learning in the modern age. The industrial revolution has been replaced by the information revolution and the knowledge economy, and jobs are changing: the jobs of the future will be less repetitive, more centered around technological innovation, more creative, more challenging — and more rewarding.

So how can we prepare for these changes in how we work? The answer is lifelong learning, which continues over the course of a person’s entire career.

“A college degree at the start of a working career does not answer the need for the continuous acquisition of new skills, especially as career spans are lengthening,” says The Economist. “Vocational training is good at giving people job-specific skills, but those, too, will need to be updated over and over again during a career lasting decades.”

Understanding the importance of continuous learning is essential to success. And the younger you are, the more obvious it is. Those who rely heavily on the Internet are learning all the time — they’ve developed the key skill of learning to learn. Even in the age of Internet, though, there’s still a place for classes, workshops and bootcamps that boost learning to new heights. Companies now spend less money on training and professional development, so it’s important for employees to have their own continuous learning strategies.

“According to the Pew survey, 54% of all working Americans think it will be essential to develop new skills throughout their working lives; among adults under 30 the number goes up to 61%,” The Economist tells us. “Another survey, conducted by Manpower in 2016, found that 93% of millennials were willing to spend their own money on further training.”

Connect2Classes wants you to find success in learning and in your career. We offer thousands of classes to help you boost your skills, keep your knowledge up-to-date and stay afloat in a competitive workforce. Regardless of your field, skills like software knowledge, social media know-how and graphic design are incredibly useful. And life skills like project management, team leadership and conflict resolution are critical to any successful career.

It’s time to get ready for the future with Connect2Classes and our wide array of online and in-person classes in Seattle and the San Francisco Bay Area. Start your lifelong learning now, and invest in your career.

About Connect2Classes — We are a marketplace for professional and life enriching classes, workshops, and learning immersives — connecting voracious learners with the best local expertise. In Seattle, Online, and soon in San Francisco!

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Creating protest art at the School of Visual Concepts

Protest Art

The Women’s March on Washington was organized in the weeks leading up to Donald Trump’s inauguration. It grew into a global phenomenon with marches organized all over the U.S. and across the world with millions of people marching for women’s rights on the day following the inauguration on January 21, 2017.

But how do you prepare for the march of a lifetime? An excellent protest poster is one way to get your message across. The School of Visual Concepts (SVC) Co-Director, Larry Asher, says his colleagues, Fiona McGuigan, Erica Sklar, and Annabelle Larner realized there was a unique opportunity to help people prepare for the marches. Protest art has been the foundation of many social movements, so SVC opened their letterpress and printing studio to help protesters create their own poster works of art.

“We were all a bit shell-shocked after the election, and we wanted to take action. We realized that we had the people and resources to enable something positive and active,” explains Asher. “We wanted to do something to advance the causes of decency, truth, and human rights while exercising our creative talents.” On January 15, 2017, they held the Seattle Women’s March Poster Making event.

Asher says that they pulled the kid-friendly event together quickly and spread the word on social media. While they only expected 100 people, they hosted roughly 350 poster-makers on the day of the event and had to turn people away. The artists created more than 500 protest posters in total and carried them to the marches they attended. “It really lifted up people’s spirits and made us realize that none of us are alone. But we’re not the star of the show, the protest artists are,” stated Asher.

Don’t feel left out if you missed that event! There are numerous opportunities to collaborate with SVC in the coming weeks. One poster design course runs from May to June 2017 for advanced students with existing portfolios of work. It is called Protests, Posters, Printing & Persisting.

“This isn’t just a class. It’s a cause. This workshop is for designers with a conscience and a desire to improve their poster design abilities, while being mentored by master poster artists, Jeff Kleinsmith and Sasha Barr, over a five-week period,” explains Asher.

Jeff Kleinsmith has been Sub Pop Records’ art director for more than 20 years. He has designed hundreds of posters and album covers for bands you’ve definitely heard of, and ones you probably haven’t. His work has appeared in numerous design books, magazines, and gallery shows, and is also in the permanent collection at MoPOP and The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Sasha Barr has been an art director for Sub Pop Records since 2007. In addition to his work in the music industry, he also does design work for Amigos Skateboards and runs his own design company, The New Year. His clients of note include Vans, Converse, Giro, Northwest Folklife Festival, Bumbershoot, and the Washington Lottery.

Upcoming Classes at SVC

Hand Lettering For Designers

More Creative and Design Classes From SVC

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Career Roadmap – Interested in the Video Game Industry?

illustration-1736462_960_720We talk a lot at Connect2Classes about how so many things are changing when it comes to preparing for a career. With so many classes, workshops and online classes available, people now have more options than ever when it comes to developing their careers. For one thing, traditional college, or at least 4-year degrees, are becoming less important in some industries. What really matters is what you can do, which can be demonstrated via a portfolio of work. If you’re a developer, it’s working apps or games, or even code samples. If you’re a designer or artist, having a strong portfolio of game art is the way to get you noticed. There are other options, as well, like project management, writing, and customer service. You can even start your own business or game studio, or work as a free agent.

If you’re into games to any degree, then a career in the games industry might be for you. In this article we will look at the roles available in the game industry, as well as some of the skills you might consider developing if one of these career paths is of interest to you. If you’d like to know how much you could expect to make in any of these careers, check out the Game Developer Salary Survey 2013.

One thing to know is that people in the game industry tend to work very hard. and hours can be long, especially during ‘crunch’ time (when a title is about to launch). Still, game companies can be very fun places to work, especially if you enjoy spending time around other gamers in a highly creative setting.

Game Production

Executive Producers might be responsible for a portfolio of games, and create budgets and launch strategies. An MBA or degree in business administration or management is helpful, and a wide array of experience in the games industry is mandatory.
Producers are typically limited to one game and are responsible for project management, scheduling and budget. They guide the overall course of game development and make sure all the pieces come together adequately. Courses or certificates in project management or game production are nice to have, but not always required.

Game Research

Market Research is where it all begins, by looking at the overall landscape, understanding competitors, and defining audiences for a game. It might also include making recommendations about launch strategy and may even affect the concept and design of a game. Market researchers typically have degrees in business, statistics or social science.
Player Research is related to the experience of game play and might involve game usability testing or play-testing. Most player researchers have advanced degrees in psychology or the social sciences and may be experts in human factors research.
Data Science is an emerging area related to data collected on players and game play. Data scientists analyze collected data and make predictions about future player behavior or help development teams with predictive models to accelerate game play. Most data scientists have backgrounds in computer science and are skilled with databases, algorithms and machine learning.

Game Design

hare-643353_960_720Game Designers are central to any game project and responsible for designing the overall story and game play elements. They maintain game design documentation and ensure that other elements (art, sound, writing, etc.) are cohesive. There are many professional programs available that focus on this area.
Mechanics or System Designers are focused on specific game mechanics, which can vary according to the genre of the game.
Level designers are responsible for designing specific tasks, missions or quests, and design both obstacle and reward systems to accompany them.

Game Art

Concept Artists are responsible for conceptualizing the game’s story, settings and characters. A background in fine art is typical, but there are also programs available that focus on video game art.
Character Design and Modeling (or Animation) is the field focused on developing characters and character detail and illustrating them in 2D or modeling them for 3D.
Level Designers on art teams are responsible for implementing the overall look and feel of a game into individual levels.
UI Design is responsible for the overall user interface including the HUD (heads-up display) and other status mechanisms.

Game Music and Sound Effects

Audio Producers and Managers are responsible for all audio content in a game, and may manage various people. A background in sound recording is useful, or a certificate in sound design for games.
Composers write original music for games, much like film or tv composers write scores.
Sound Designers are focused on all of the ambient sound in a game, and work to uphold the game’s vision through sound.

Game Storytelling and Writing

Narrative Designers are responsible for the overall story and for ensuring that the narrative plays out through all the various elements of the game. Any sort of creative writing background is useful here, and experience with games, in particular, is mandatory. Education in game design theory and game mechanics is also helpful.
Writers are typically given projects to work on, like writing content for quests, or character dialogue.

minecraft-1017449_640Game and Systems Development

Game/Systems Architects are responsible for overall technical design of a world and may recommend or develop a game engine, as well. A background in computer science is typical for this role, and specific education in game development is also useful.
Game Developers and Programmers are typically assigned to some aspect(s) of the game and may work on one or several components for a length of time.

Game Testing

Quality Assurance positions are not terribly well paid, but they are frequently entry level. You’ll be playing games to find glitches or bugs, or even issues with usability.

Game Talent

Character Models are used as a basis for concept art or 3D models. A standard modeling portfolio is just about all you will need, though games-specific experience is also appreciated.
Voiceover Actors supply the voices for characters. Any voiceover experience could be relevant, but you will need a demo reel and will have to audition.
Motion Capture Actors are agile and disciplined people who take direction readily.

mario-1557974_960_720Marketing and Advertising

Marketing roles in game companies can cover a lot of territory, from strategic planning to communications, event/trade show planning, marketing and advertising campaigns, and social media. If you have experience in other digital-related fields it’s possible to parlay that experience for the games industry, especially if you’re an avid gamer yourself.

Customer Support

Customer Support roles are some of the most important, and some of them are entry level positions.

Community Managers monitor and moderate social media, forum posts, knowledge bases and other locations where game information is shared. They help resolve disputes and often provide input on the player point-of-view to development teams.

Educate Yourself

It’s never been easier to educate yourself for a career in the games industry. Playing a lot of games is helpful, of course, but there are also many classes and workshops that will help you learn specifics. If you’re really serious, consider a degree or certificate from a school that specializes in game design and development.

 

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Preparing For The Jobs of the Future

With technology advancing so rapidly, we know that the next 10-20 years will be full of changes to how people work. This means changes, as well, in how people educate themselves and how they find work. For one thing, the rapid advancement in technology will reach exponential proportions and along with it, the changes needed in the workforce.

Increasing automation is also looming on the horizon, but what it means is that some types of jobs will wane. Over the long term, technological innovation creates more new jobs than are lost through obsolescence. And some industries will continue to thrive, including healthcare and retail.

Earlier this year, the World Economic Forum reported that humanity would be out 7 million jobs by 2020 due to automation—with admin and office jobs taking the brunt of the blow. – Monster.com

We are also coming upon a new era of human potential, with robotics, human augmentation, space travel, virtual reality, holography, self-driving cars, and sustainability/permaculture innovations creating entirely new industries. It’s the stuff of our futuristic dreams, and you can be involved.

The best way to predict the future is to invent it. – Alan Kay

A lot of new career choices are also emerging, some of which would have seemed inconceivable just a couple of decades ago. So, how best to prepare for this shifting career terrain? For one thing, becoming a lifelong learner keeps you current, and that keeps you competitive.

With the world moving as fast as it is, we need to become a society of people who are always learning new things. – Julie Friedman Steele, World Future Society

The Career and Business Crystal Ball

Consider that many of today’s jobs barely existed 10-20 years ago, but are now commonplace and lucrative:

  • ipad-605420_960_720Mobile and tablet application developers
    Game designers and developers
  • Social media coordinators and managers
  • Web content developers
  • Big data miners and scientists
  • Personalization and automation specialists
  • Robotics and nano-technology scientists
  • User experience researchers and designers
  • Digital artists, animators, and illustrators
  • 3D printing manufacturers
  • Health, wellness and life extension practitioners
  • Life and career coaching
  • Renewable energy jobs

162 Jobs in the Future…

Free Agents

smartphone-1733892_960_720Free agent culture thrives in the film, media, and music industries and is beginning to spill over into the other creative and tech industries. With many freelance marketplaces available, professionals can gravitate towards project-based work. It’s not for everyone, but if flexibility and novelty drive you, becoming a free agent can be a great lifestyle choice. It also means that if you have several unique skillsets, you can work on projects in a variety of roles.

Free agents are:

  • Project managers
  • Graphic designers and illustrators
  • Digital and traditional artists
  • Film and video crews
  • Bloggers and podcasters
  • Photographers
  • Musicians
  • Web and application developers
  • Writers and journalists
  • Teachers and instructional designers
  • Speakers and coaches
  • Special needs and occupational therapists

Entrepreneurs and Small Business

teens-629046_960_720Becoming an entrepreneur has never been easier, given the technology, fund-raising, and marketing tools now widely available. Even if you are just in the idea or prototype phase, crowd-funding your endeavor is a real possibility. How do you know if your idea will appeal to modern consumers? Novelty, life enrichment, efficiency, and convenience are major drivers.

  • Technology start-ups – cloud-based services, wearables, virtual reality, pervasive/ubiquitous computing, and artificial intelligence.
  • Food-based businesses – artisanal food products, food delivery services, special diets, and health & wellness.
  • 3D printing – buildings, household items, organs, and even food!
  • Robotics and artificial intelligence – robots for manufacturing, caretaking, and dangerous jobs. AI and machine learning for better prediction and personalization.
  • Renewable energy and sustainability – solar, wind, and green building practices.
  • Urban, hydroponic, and vertical farming.
  • Cannabis businesses – growing, distribution, equipment, and edibles.
  • Online sellers – handmade items or small manufacturers selling through sites like Amazon and Etsy.
  • Lifelong learning providers – for in person and online learning.
  • Bio-medical devices – health and wellness monitoring and tracking, body augmentation.
  • Space exploration, mining, and tourism.
  • Citizen journalism, social activism, and education.

Jobs of the Future

blog2How do you prepare for jobs that don’t exist yet? With more exciting developments on the horizon, the jobs of the future will spring out of today’s innovations in bio-tech, climate adaptation, personal care, and a wide array of technological innovations. Future jobs will require more complex and specialized skills; things that robots and automation aren’t great for.

It’s going to take a long time for robots to be good at soft skills, like social and emotional intelligence and cross-cultural competency. – Fast Company

 

 

Essential Skills for Future Careers:

  • Digital and social media literacy
  • Adaptability and agility
  • Knowing how to learn
  • Networking and collaboration with others
  • Problem-solving
  • Critical thinking
  • Managing chaos
  • Simplifying and minimizing complexity
  • Entrepreneurial and creative thinking
  • Mentorship and coaching
  • Anticipating customer needs

Enter your interests and receive $10 off your first class!

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Want to learn how to do something life-changing?
Check out thousands of upcoming classes on Connect2Classes.

 

 

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Why Making Things Helps Us Thrive

We can all use more things in our life that make us feel happy and fulfilled. There has been a cultural renaissance these last few years as we learn more about what really motivates people. It’s something we nearly lost in our manufacturing-heavy culture: the pleasure associated with making things and sharing one’s creations with others. This is also a business opportunity, so read on if you are intrigued by the idea of turning your passion into an enterprise.

This is a revolution. If you can imagine it, you can make it. And that’s new to the world. – Mark Hatch, CEO, Maker Media

Your Brain on Creativity

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Why does making and sharing things feel so good? It begins with creativity, one of those things that spurs us on to ever greater accomplishments. There is nothing quite like creative experiences to throttle our brains into happier brain chemistry by putting us into the flow states associated with positive psychology. And creative thinking also has benefits in other parts of our lives: it improves problem-solving, big picture and design thinking, as well as collaboration with others.

It doesn’t matter whether you are into art, crafts, DIY, or tinkering, your brain loves to create and rewards you for doing so. The process of creating and sharing your creations releases dopamine, a natural anti-depressant in your brain. Dopamine is the brain chemical associated with reward and the pleasurable sensations that come from it. It’s like we are wired to create. But legions of artists, crafters, do-it-yourselfers and makers could tell you that!

There’s survey evidence to support crafting’s dopamine effect. In one study of more than 3,500 knitters, published in The British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 81% of respondents with depression reported feeling happy after knitting. More than half reported feeling “very happy.”

The positive effect of creative activities is well-documented in the scientific literature. Creativity and the novel experiences associated with it keep the brain agile and also motivate us. Things as simple as coloring or doodling encourage this effect, but the most benefit comes from ongoing creative pursuits:

Crafting can help those who suffer from anxiety, depression or chronic pain, experts say. It may also ease stress, increase happiness and protect the brain from damage caused by aging. – CNN

Do Schools Kill Creativity?

The following talk by British educator Sir Ken Robinson is one of the most popular TED Talks of all time. He argues that creativity is more important than literacy and that traditional schooling kills creativity. This is especially true now that home economics, woodshop, arts, and music are disappearing from schools. Less young people are learning how to cook, sew, and build via formal education, although classes, camps and after-school activities are filling the gap. Robinson says that our innate drive to create and to embrace trial and error are not valued in an educational system that tries to minimize failure. Creativity also tends to be multi-disciplinary, which is not widely embraced in our siloed educational systems.

DIY & Maker Culture

A major trend the last decade or so has been a shift towards people becoming more and more creative and leveraging that creativity to explore new interests or even launch new businesses. We’re creating handmade and one-of-a-kind items that stand out in the world of mass manufacturing. Some of us are launching businesses on sites like Etsy, an extravaganza of novel items launched from creative brains (which boasts 25 million shoppers). This has been fueled, as well, by the recession economy that has turned so many people into entrepreneurs:

In a world of mass-produced products, modern technology has made it easier than ever for a single individual to create and distribute items that are customizable and unique without having middlemen like manufacturers. This growing shift will continue to affect the economy and will likely have big implications on large retailers. It is a special time in history that will have a transformative impact on our future. – Huffington Post

You might have heard about the Maker movement, a grassroots movement based on the emergence of consumer-level tools for design and manufacturing. It’s reported that 135 million Americans are makers, which is nearly half the population. The maker manifesto calls for making, sharing, giving, and learning. It’s making a difference. MakerFaires are popping up everywhere, and there are other maker-inspired communities and events, as well:

Craft nights are replacing book clubs. Libraries and museums are being turned into “Makerspaces,” physical locations where people can come together to make. The sale of sewing kits in Walmart stores has recently gone up 30 percent. And just last year, someone created Christmas cookies using a 3D printer. – Huffington Post

This has become a major economic phenomenon because of a perfect storm of conditions:

  • Access to increasingly sophisticated tools to create, like 3-D printers.
  • The ability to find inspiration online.
  • Crowdfunding to make your idea reality.
  • Online marketplaces and social channels to get feedback and distribute creations.
  • Inexpensive and effective tools for branding, marketing, and promotion.
  • Learning opportunities provided by other creators.

Boosting Your Creativity and Learning DIY Skills

Albert Einstein said that creativity is intelligence having fun. At Connect2Classes, we are committed to helping our learners explore their creative potential. Creative businesses can be some of the most fulfilling, as well as being lucrative in a world of people looking for unique and one-of-a-kind items. We’d love to hear about how your creative endeavors affect your life – please comment!

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Want to learn how to do something life-changing?
Check out thousands of upcoming classes on Connect2Classes.

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Embrace Social! Update Your Skills in Digital & Social Media Marketing

embrace social media and update your skills

Digital and social media are an important part of any marketer’s toolkit, but it does tend to be a bit confusing for the uninitiated. In reality, however, it isn’t that much different from traditional marketing. The goals are the same (raise awareness, convert potential customers, promote advocacy and word-of-mouth sharing), and social interactions online offer some great benefits and allow you to scale your marketing efforts beyond your current capacity. It’s also about being where your target markets are and social media offers great ways to connect with customers as they explore their interests. Facebook alone has 1.6 BILLION users so it is a huge opportunity to augment your marketing efforts.

we are social Source: SmartInsights

A few important reasons to take digital and social media marketing seriously, especially if your customers are avid Internet users:

Raise Awareness and Keep Your Brand Top of Mind

Building and maintaining awareness of your brand, products and services is a constant challenge. By having a robust presence on social media, you can promote your brand and offerings and make sure they are available where your potential customers already are. Read about the most popular social networks worldwide.

Demonstrate Credibility

Social media is a great way to establish your credibility in a space. You also demonstrate knowledge and credibility by connecting with and promoting others in your space. This means following influencers and commenting on or sharing their content. ‘Stand on the shoulders of giants’ is a good way to think about it. You can align your messaging and content with popular activity in the social sphere.

Real-time Engagement

Your digital marketing and social media efforts keep you involving customers and allow you to respond to questions or comments in real-time. Your customers can be huge advocates for you and will happily share your content across social media if you involve them.

Share Knowledge

Internet users tend to gravitate towards content that has value, meaning old marketing messages don’t work nearly as well as sharing tangible knowledge about things people care about. Social media can also be a great vehicle for customer service, if you make a point to respond quickly to customer questions and feedback. The more you respond, the more customers will gravitate towards those channels.

Penetrate Your Target Markets

Social media preferences tend to vary quite a lot by age and gender, and some social media sites (like LinkedIn) are centered around professional connections. You can also schedule content to be published and use hashtags and boards on many of the services to keep your messages aligned with broader trends.

Respond In Real-time

A major area of value for the wired generations is the ability to conduct business in real-time. Social media is a great way to ensure your availability whenever someone has a question or feedback. You can also take it a step further by being available on chat networks (like Snapchat or Facebook Messenger) as well.

Be More Efficient (and Save Money)

Social media marketing is so important because it allows you to scale your efforts significantly and reaches a much larger audience. There are some great tools that allow you to post across multiple channels and set up automation so your voice is being heard even when you aren’t available. These are all really low-cost ways of getting your message out there.

Some Questions You Might Have

  • How can you align your digital strategy with your offline marketing efforts?
  • Which social media channels are best for engaging with your target audience?
  • What engagement and writing styles work best?
  • How often should you be posting to your blog or sending email?
  • Would social ads be a good investment for you?
  • How can you measure your success?

If you’re intrigued by these suggestions check out our social media and digital marketing classes or consider the following upcoming classes:

Online Courses

  • Digital Marketing Suite
    How to market your business on the Internet.
  • LinkedIn 101
    Use this business-oriented channel to boost your career or business.
  • Achieving Top Search Engine Positions
    All about SEO and how to achieve great results.

Quick 1-day Classes

  • Digital Marketing Bootcamp
    How to tie your digital and offline campaigns together. An all day class on Oct. 21st.
  • Visual Design and User Experience for Email
    Email can be one of your most important digital marketing channels. Learn how on Nov. 9th.
  • Social Media Advertising
    Learn how to make paid advertising work for you with this class Oct. 22nd.
  • Blogging 101
    How to create a successful blog and make money doing it. Oct 20th.
  • Search Engine Optimization (SEO) for Non-Profits
    Get a real look under the hood with free classes beginning Oct 19th.

In-depth Courses

  • 10-Week Digital Marketing Intensive
    A great place to start if you are wondering how digital marketing and social media can improve your business. Begins Oct 8th, Nov. 5th or Dec. 13th.
  • Site Audit Workshop
    This 6-week course will teach you the fundamentals of site analytics and improvement. Begins Oct. 20th.

What students say about our life-changing professional courses:

I attended the Web Development Immersive course. It changed my life. Within 1 1/2 months of graduation, I was offered a great job at a company that’s considered one of the top 5 to work for in the Pacific NW. Starting next week I’ll be a Software Engineer making more than twice what I made in my previous career, and I enjoy the work much more.


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Want to learn how to do something life-changing?
Check out thousands of upcoming classes on Connect2Classes.

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Meet Jeff Barlow: Typography Instructor, 80’s Rock Aficionado and Salmon Griller

Jeff Barlow

Jeff Barlow teaches Typography at the School of Visual Concepts in Seattle. To say Jeff’s design enthusiasm is contagious is an understatement. Jeff has immersed himself in the design community in Seattle and has shared his love of design, concept and typography with individuals and large groups. His poster work and ideas have been featured in the HOW International Design Annual, the HOW Self-Promotion Annual, and Communication Arts. His design experience includes work for Starbucks, Expedia, National MS Society, Make-A-Wish Foundation, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, and The Who!

We asked Jeff some questions about teaching and other random things:

What three words of advice would you give your younger self?

See Iron Maiden. (C2C: I think we are going to see a pattern here.)

What brought you to teaching?

I am very vocal about my love for Typography and someone asked me to teach a typography course at one of the local design schools. I had been doing that for a while when I heard about the unique approach of SVC (all classes taught by professionals) so I reached out to the SVC Leaders. They had a class that needed an instructor and the rest is history — I’ll keep teaching there as long as they’ll let me.

What do you enjoy the most about teaching and why?

Two things. First, I love when I have a student who really doesn’t understand much about the subject I’m teaching, and all of a sudden I see the light come on in their eyes. They’ve grasped the new concept(s) and now they can never go back. Second, I love when students go away with an assignment and come back with a project that just blows my mind — They’ve created something that has a great idea and a brilliant execution. I’ve seen so many students come up with work that’s better than I could do myself and it’s really inspiring.

What person in history would you like to have over for dinner? What would you cook?

From design history? Adrian Frutiger. I’d serve barbecued salmon.

From real history? Jim Lovell. I could talk about the NASA Apollo program forever. He’d also get the salmon.

How has teaching impacted your views on life?

I’ve decided that a teacher is not a person in front of a class, or a person with some title. A teacher is someone who makes the people around them better. I’ve been lucky enough to have a lot of wonderful teachers in my life and less than half of them have been in classroom settings.

How do you inspire your students? Do you have a particular teaching style? If so, how would you describe it?

I don’t know if I have a particular teaching style. I try to set up circumstances where the students can learn from each other. I also know that I’m very easily distracted and it’s hard to pay attention in a classroom setting. So when I’m in front of the class I just try to come up with stuff that wouldn’t bore me if I was one of the students.

What is your guilty pleasure?

KISS Double Platinum. Or anything with dark chocolate.

Do you, or have you taught other subjects? Tell us more!

I used to teach a class on Annual Report Design. I’ve also spoken at conferences and taught conference workshops on Design and Typography. Here’s an example of the work from a type workshop I taught at a Seattle Design conference.

If you could learn one thing immediately today, what would it be?

A leadership class on when to push and when to back off.

If you could travel in time, where/when would you go?

Easy. Feb 9, 1964. The Ed Sullivan Theater.

What quote seems like it is speaking directly to you?

That’s not contrast! Paul Rand.

What are some of your favorite resources on the subjects you teach? Books, blogs, associations, even movies.

The Annual of the New York Type Directors Club.

A History of Graphic Design (Phil Meggs).

Describe a funny, inspiring or random story about a class you gave or took.

I was driving down the street one day and across the street I saw one of my students from several years before. He saw me and started violently waving his arms as if he were in some sort of emergency. I had to know what the problem was so I stopped and rolled down my window. He crossed two lanes of traffic and came up to my car. With a big smile he told me that he was glad that he had run into me because had thought of me just the other night. He and his girlfriend had been watching a movie and he made her watch the opening credits in slow motion. And of course, he never would have done that before taking my typography class. His girlfriend has never met me, but I think she hates me.

Jeff is teaching Whole Brain Typography October 16, 2015. You just might want to get in on that!

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Made in Seattle Week

Made IN Seattle week

Our friends at General Assembly are celebrating their one year anniversary in Seattle in style! They have created a week of education to highlight great local products being developed in the city — from tech and design to music, food, and beer. From Monday, June 1- Friday, June 5 they are bringing people from all backgrounds together to foster collaboration through education. You can learn a bit more about some of the great work others are doing across a variety of disciplines all over Seattle.

Trending in Tech

Monday, June 1, 2015

The week starts on Monday with keynote speakers from tech companies born in Seattle including Zulily, Zillow, and Moz talking about their perspectives on innovation. You’ll hear from the best leaders right here at home about how products can change a traditional industry, how corporations can foster ingenuity within the startup scene and how company culture can be made into an invaluable resource for innovation.

Food for the Future

Tuesday, 2 June

Panelists from restaurants and food-related businesses born in Seattle like Chaco Canyon, Seattle Tilth, and others will talk about food sustainability and culture. You’ll hear from leaders from different sides of the food industry talks about their biggest concerns for food today, including fair wages and practices for farmers and growers, sourcing and sustainability, and what the future of food looks like locally.

Disruptive Design

Wednesday, 3 June

Keynote speakers from design-centric companies born in Seattle will talk about groundbreaking design in our culture and economy. You’ll hear from innovators from companies like Built by Civilization, Artefact, Meld Home, and Miller Hull about experiences that cross the boundaries of physical and digital, including topics such as hardware design, disrupting your workspace and workflow, and an informed outlook on a digital future.

Brew Your Business

Thursday, 4 June

Panelists from your favorite breweries in Seattle will gather to share insights into the professional world of beer. You’ll hear from the brewmasters themselves about their early days and how their vision transformed into the local companies we know and love. Drink and learn about everything from what beer making looks like as a hobby to where experts from Ghostfish, Fremont, and Hilliards see the future of microbreweries in Seattle.

Makers in Music

Friday, 5 June

Panelists from various aspects of the Seattle music scene will discuss digital technologies and their impact on the music industry. You’ll hear from thought leaders and acclaimed musicians that rose to fame in Seattle about how the distribution of songs and albums has been shaped by the internet’s free market, how the relationship between record labels and artists has adjusted to the times, and what the future of music looks like in a digital world.

Follow the conversation with their hashtag #MadeinSEA.

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